reede, 25. mai 2018

Ludo&Noe's bog blog (liceo ginnasio Luigi Galvani)


A day in a bog!
Trunks of trees in the forest

On the 24th of May 2018 it was possible for us to go to the Pärnu bog, named Tolkuse, situated in the Häädemeeste municipality, Pärnu County. We went there by bus with an international group, a biology guide and a very good wise girl who translated her explanation in english. 


Tour trail
After a few stairs to climb, the guide brought us to the trail that starts at the information board about the nature reserve in the parking area, 162 km on Tallinn-Pärnu road.The circular 2 km trail, partially on boardwalk, is situated in Luitemaa Nature Reserve: it takes about 2 hours to complete it. Along the way there’s an observation tower 18 m above sea level on top of the hill, offering stunning views of Häädemeeste coastal meadow and the Pärnu bay from one side and the Tolkuse bog from the other side. So she introduced us the two different types of  landscapes that we were going to see while walking on the trail. 


Huulhein
Bog pool
During the hike we took a lot of pictures and photos of the beautiful wildlife. We saw the dunes of the coastal forest, Tolkuse bog and channel Timmkanal. The study trail leads to the largest bog pool, where the water lily and bog bean grow. Along the boardwalk you can spot sundews, beak-rush, tussock cottongrass and sphagnum mosses of various colours.


Tree


During the visit we learnt how to appreciate the nature how it's made with her peaceful landscapes and we came back very proud to this natural experience where we were completely absorbed in the inspiring air of the bog.





Elia blog about the viru bog and forest

visiting the viru bog (Viru raba)
24th  may 2018
the sky was clear and the the sun was shining when we,from the horizon exchange ,
arrived to the viru bog natural site and we walked into the forest,  The motorway, the noise and our minivan were far behind us; the air was fresh, and the thread-like moss . Along the way, we have been entarteined by the guide.
Risultati immagini per viru bog estonia
We sought a break from the obstacle course and weather in the lookout tower. From the top, the panorama gave us a sense of the vast wilderness that surrounded us.
I couldn’t put a finger on why such a flat landscape inspired so much awe. Maybe it was the otherworldly, prehistoric appearance. Maybe I wondered too much about the secrets that the bog could have hidden. Maybe it was the way it consumed everything that was built to traverse the quagmire and remained unblemished by vehicle tracks.
Risultati immagini per viru bog
As we kept walking, the trees became sparser and thinner.  We had arrived at Viru bog, but we did not notice until two rows of dark wooden planks appeared on the path. To our untrained eyes, the thick carpet of moss and shrubs appeared uniform throughout the walk, and the transition to wetland wasn’t obvious.
All was quiet, save  our footsteps and our chatter, and I spotted only one frog the entire time we were there.  For now, it was just the six of us and the elements. Fish were absent in those dark and still pools of water, but at least they were devoid of mosquitoes too that may afternoon. I found the peace much easier to appreciate in the absence of biting insects.
The smell of labrador tea that grows in bogs is said to make some people nauseous, but something else was odd. The aroma of pine timber was in the air though.
Risultati immagini per viru bog estoniaThe Estonians probably trusted us not to kill ourselves or the environment when they left barriers out of the plans, but curiosity was getting the better of me. Tarmo had told us that Viru was a raised bog, a 3-metre thick layer of peat that grew a millimetre a year (go figure its age), but what did it really mean? If I stepped on it, would it yield its fluid like a wet sponge, or would it swallow me up and turn me into a future museum artifact ? There was only one way to find out.
I gingerly lowered my foot onto an even patch of moss. The two barely touched, and nothing grabbed my shoe. So far, so good.
Weight was added, bit by bit, until I was resting on that foot. It sagged, but it didn’t give way. But I don’t weigh a lot.
I gave it a bounce, then a few more. The cushioning was very supple. If it weren’t for the rain I could have laid on it. Then I remembered there were ticks in the area, and I quickly moved along.
Give me a  mosquito-free day here and I would have spent it all breathing deeply there, enjoying the peace.

Michael Calabrese (liceo ginnasio Luigi Galvani) GALVANI DOCET


24th of may 2018
today all the people participating at the horizon project went visiting a bog. the first thing we saw was a tower in the middle of a sandy area, where our guide explained us that people get lost in the woods whie they look for mushrooms. then she gave us some sweets, whicch are necessary to survive in the forest. we then walked to another place and what we immediatly noticed was the vegetation. one of the most important things we talked about was how thw plants changed from 30 meters tall trees to 20 centimeters in just 3 meters one from the other. Everyone who heads out on one of these hikes in Soomaa National Park is given a pair of bog shoes and will be led by a local guide, who will provide instructions and tell interesting stories about the area. You will get to experience the thrill of walking in places that would otherwise be inaccessible. Interesting to know: bog shoes have been around for a long time – they were first used by our ancestors for moving around in the bogs.
Risultati immagini per parnu bog review
 an important part of the tour was the stop we had at the pond which you can see here in the picture. this pond has a special water in it, that water is the cleanest on the world and it was also used to clean wod made stuff and to cure normal diseases. he smell of labrador tea that grows in bogs is said to make some people nauseous, but something else was odd. The aroma of pine timber was in the air though. Surely there couldn’t be logging when the trees were so skinny? It turned out that a new, wider walkway was being built over the old, decaying one. In time it will be returned to nature, and the process will take place quietly under the new planks.
The Estonians probably trusted us not to kill ourselves or the environment when they left barriers out of the plans, but curiosity was getting the better of me. Tarmo had told us that Viru was a raised bog, a 3-metre thick layer of peat that grew a millimetre a year (go figure its age), but what did it really mean? If I stepped on it, would it yield its fluid like a wet sponge, or would it swallow me up and turn me into a future dead person There was only one way to find out.
I gingerly lowered my foot onto an even patch of moss. The two barely touched, and nothing grabbed my shoe. So far, so good.
Weight was added, bit by bit, until I was resting on that foot. It sagged, but it didn’t give way. But I don’t weigh a lot.
I gave it a bounce, then a few more. The cushioning was very supple. If it weren’t for the rain I could have laid on it. Then I remembered there were ticks in the area, and I quickly moved along.

Matilde and Miriam (Liceo Galileo Galilei Vr)



Discovering the bog


Yesterday morning, on the 24th of May, we went to Häädemeeste forest which at first impact impressed us for the flora's richness. Not only were the trees towering in front of us as if to guide us through the intricated paths, but peculiar  and quite out of the ordinary noises made us want to discover more. And so we did!


 Actually we ended up on the top of a soaring tower where we had a magnificent view. From there we could see the Baltic sea and a vast forest that flourished all around. The landscape conveyed us the idea of the uncontaminated nature which grows wild. It was a really powerful image. Emerald green made the brown far-away background stand out: it was the bog.


Soon after the guide brough us there introducing the scenery we were about to see. Thanks to her explanations and amusing anecdotes we understood and became familiar with the nature around us. Among these, there was the fact of the changing soil. In a certain way it remembered musk. Mushy and rather humid it was the leit motiv of the whole trip. For this reason we had to follow a wooden trail paying attention not to step on the soil as it would take seven years to recover. 

When we arrived at the heart of the bog, the guide explained us that the lagoon's water can be used to heal some infections. Moreover there it was also possible to swim or drink that same water but none of us help so brave.

It is to say that we deeply enjoyed the whole experience. This close involvement overwhelmed the group and this, I think, is the best outcome of the day!

Maddalena Pastorino and Simona Nexha (Liceo Galileo Galilei)

A Walk into the Past
24.05.2018

As we were walking through the Tolkuse we had the feeling that we were in another time of the Earth age: the time when civilization didn't exist and everything was at its "raw" stage.
Everything around us was untouched by the rough hand of the man. Also the sun seemed brighter and closer to that landscape as if it was the only part of the Earth it was lighting it up.
The quiet and the calm that place had, gave us goose bumps.
To us it's impossible even to think about a place so pure where the contact between nature and animals is so close, and we weren't left apart from that magical bond, we were included and we felt part of it; our hearts beated at the same time as the wind hit our faces.
Going back to the bus was like crossing a time door and coming back to the present.
This experience made us realize how lucky we are to be able to call Earth "home"; it's for places like this that make us wanna travel the world and have a closer contact with nature beacause it helps us to find ourselves and discover the purpose of why we're living.
We're so used to all the good things we're able to do, to have and to be, but we need to be more grateful and start helping the enviroment and the ones who are around us that share life everyday with us to keep this rare places alive as well as the emotions that this things provide us.



A day in the bog, Maëlle&Esther


On the 24th of May 2018, we went with a group of exchange students to a bog near Pärnu called Tolkuse. We enjoyed a tour around the forest and we learned about plants, all the while walking to the swamp. We followed the set path so not to drown. the tour guide told us all about the plants and different species living there, and an Estonian student from year nine translated for us. 

First we arrived at the site and started walking into the forest on a path that eventually led to the swamp. The first stop on our guided walk was a watchtower, from here you could see the Baltic sea and over the whole plain where the bog is located. Then we continued walking through the forest when we suddenly came to an open space where there was only a wooden path. We followed the path to a more secluded area where there was a little lake. The guide told us that because of certain types of moss the water is filtered and without bacteria and mineral and you could drink the water without anuy consequences. This also means that objects decompose very slowly and sometimes dead hikers are found drifting in the water. Because of this there are also objects from the viking era that are found in pristine conditions. 



After this we continued our trek and came in the forest once again. Here we were told to watch out for snakes that could possibly lay on the path. The trees we saw were pine trees, they were very tall and thin and they provided well needed shade on this hot day. Because of the humid climate in the bog there were lots of mosquitos that swarmed around us. They were annoying. Besides snakes we were also told that there were lizards and legless lizards, we only saw a regular lizard. 




After this two hour tour where we eventually only walked about one kilometer, we were back at the bus. We drove to the next stop: a visitors centre from the RMK. Here there was a different guide who told us all about different species of birds and there trekking habits. We were shown the visitors centre and all of the things you could do there. Then we took a walk around the area while the guide told us about the ringing program in Rannametsa-Tolkuse. In september at the beginning of the trekking season they hang up nets at about a height of ten metres and the volunteers catch birds and ring them. This way researchers can keep up with migrating patterns of various species, which tells us a lot about the overal climate change of the world. We continued our walk and arrived at the beach. Here we saw swans swimming in the Baltic sea, which was kind of strange for us because in the North sea there aren't any swans. The guide told us this was because the levels of salt in the Baltic sea are so low that it doesn't affect the swans. This was where our tour ended 
and we walked back to have lunch at the site. 


Bog Blog from Nan&Char


Visiting the Bog.

Yesterday, on the 24th of May, we visited the bog. We were with a big group, a guide (a biology teacher from the Estonian school) and a girl who translated the guide in English.
We went by bus to the place where the tour started. We had to climb a couple of big stairs, so we got a good view of the whole bog. Then, the tour continued so went down again to see the rest of the bog. First, there were a lot trees but later the surroundings changed into an empty landscape.



The guide told a lot of stories about the bog and people who come there. One of the stories was about local old ladies who come to the bog and pick berries for making jam. Sometimes, those old ladies get lost in the marsh while picking the berries.


To make sure we would survive, we got a candy from the guide. If
we would get lost, we could take  this candy and think about how                                                            we would get back to the group.

After the bog walking, we went to a nature house near the bog. It was a tiny little house with rests of dead animals. First, we had a little picknick with fruits and then we got a little tour through the house. A woman who works in the house, told us a things about the animals. Mostly about the local birds and how people recognize the birds. There are cameras in the trees to follow the birds every night and day. They showed us the live images from one of the cameras.

Later, we went outside to take a walk. In the trees were nets and the guide explained us, they are used by vollunteers for catching birds. The reason for catching the birds is to put rings around their legs, so they can track them. After the explanation about the birds, we walked further to the beach, where the guide told us about every single plant.
After a two hours walk, we finished and had some food from the barbeque.


We really enjoyed the trip to the bog because we do not have any of this in Holland and we never saw something like this before. We have learned a lot of new things and we are grateful for that.

Charlotte and Ananda,
from Holland.

kolmapäev, 23. mai 2018

24.-25.05 Visiting the bog, picnic and nature blogging

Springtime in Pärnu – Nature and Science

24.05  8.15 Meet up in the school
            8.30 – 13.00 Visiting the bog
            13.00 Picnic in the nature
            16.00 Back in the city
25.05  8.15 Meet up in the school
            8.30- 11.30 Putting together a nature blog about the bog visit
            12.00 Lunch   

Viimane postitus

Ludo&Noe's bog blog (liceo ginnasio Luigi Galvani)

A day in a bog! Trunks of trees in the forest On the 24th of May 2018 it was possible for us to go to the Pärnu bog, named Tolkuse, ...